Home Cures 9 Health Benefits of Birch Buds with Remedies

9 Health Benefits of Birch Buds with Remedies

by Andreea Laza

Want to know how to use birch buds for their amazing health benefits? Continue reading this article and see what are the health benefits of birch buds and how to use them in home remedies.

In Eastern Slavic mythology, the birch tree was considered a sacred tree because of its majestic beauty and therapeutic qualities. For hundreds of years, Russian peasants have been using birch buds, birch flowers, catkins (female flowers), and birch sap as a cure for many diseases. Dressed like a prince of the forest in its silver-white coat, the birch tree has great healing powers. The natural remedies from birch can alleviate a wide array of health conditions, from simple colds to cardiovascular problems and even stomach, respiratory, or kidney ailments. Learn more about the health benefits of birch buds and how to use them at home.

9 Health Benefits of Birch Buds with Remedies & Harvesting

How to Harvest Birch Buds

Birch buds are harvested in early spring before they bloom. To harvest them, cut them along with the small twigs they are attached to (25-30 cm), tie them in small 12-15 pieces bouquets, and then leave them to air dry in the open air. After drying, separate the birch buds from the twigs and store them in paper bags, glass containers, or closed wooden boxes with lids. The twigs can be used for teas or herbal baths.

Are Birch Buds Edible?

Yes, birch buds from silver and white birch species are edible. They can be harvested alongside or after collecting the birch sap and can be eaten raw when they have not yet bloomed or are still slightly loosened. Their taste is astringent, but they can be combined in salads, or mixed with salts to make aromatic salts, or spice mixes, to bring an extra natural flavor to foods. Now let’s get to the health benefits of birch buds.

Health Benefits of Birch Buds - Natural Remedies with Birch Buds
Freshly harvested birch buds

What Are Birch Buds Good For?

In modern phytotherapy, birch buds preparations (teas, tinctures) are rich in flavonoids, have diuretic properties, and are used to boost local immunity. When used internally, the main health benefits of birch buds are:

  • boost immunity of the respiratory tract
  • protect the oral cavity, larynx, and amygdala
  • antibacterial action (can kill E. coli, staphylococcus, and streptococcus)
  • anti-cancer properties
  • support kidney functions
  • fighting against water retention
  • reduce cellulite
  • eliminate excess uric acid, urea, nitrogen, creatinine, and other excess minerals from the body
  • weight loss and detox (when combined with birch sap)

When combined with birch leaves tea, birch buds boost their diuretic, astringent, purifying, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, making them great natural remedies for intestinal parasites, kidney stones, and urinary tract infections. Used externally, birch buds are good for:

  • cleansing oily complexions
  • alleviating allergic skin reactions
  • fighting dandruff, acne, hives, cellulite
  • oropharyngeal infections
  • protect against cavities, bacterial plaque, and gum inflammation.

These health benefits of birch buds are greatly enhanced when combined with birch bark extracts, due to their higher content of betulin and betulinic acid in birch bark. The birch tree species used in natural medicine are the silver birch (Betula pendula syn. Betula verrucosa) and the white birch (Betula pubescens).

9 Health Benefits of Birch Buds with Remedies

1. Intestinal Parasites

Birch buds tincture is one of the simplest and most effective natural remedies for intestinal parasites. To prepare it, pour 100 ml of homemade alcohol over 20 grams of birch buds in an amber glass container. Leave to soak for three weeks in a cool place away from light. Strain the tincture and have 15-20 drops before meals, three times a day. This is one of the most important health benefits of birch buds.

2. Stomach Ulcers

The birch buds tincture is also great for stomach ulcers. Soak 50 grams of birch buds in 500 ml of alcohol for 10-12 days. Have one teaspoon 15-20 minutes before eating at most. This preparation has beneficial effects on metabolism, can boost appetite, and is a good natural remedy for intestinal worms.

3. Allergies

Prepare the same tincture as in the remedy for stomach ulcers, but this time leave to macerate for one month. You can use the birch bud maceration in a two-week cure while having one teaspoon, 3 times a day. Pause for another two weeks and resume once only if needed. This is one of the main health benefits of birch buds.

4. Natural Joints Balm

Birch buds balm is a natural remedy for joint pain. To prepare the balm, you need the following ingredients:

  • 350 grams of birch buds
  • 700 grams of quality butter
  • 10 grams of camphor oil
  • a bit of regular bread dough

In a small enameled or clay pot with a lid, lay the birch buds and butter in one and a half cm thick layer. Stick the bread dough over the mouth of the pot, so that when you put the lid on, it will close tightly. Bake at very low heat for 8-10 hours. Turn off the heat and leave the pot in the oven to cool gradually overnight. Take out the birch buds and add the camphor to the melted butter. Mix well and store in an amber glass container and the birch buds balm is ready. This natural balm is very beneficial for rheumatic pains when applied in a thin layer.

5. Tuberculosis

One of the less-known health benefits of birch buds is their use in tuberculosis. This is an Eastern European recipe that calls for the following ingredients:

  • 150 grams of birch buds
  • 1 kg linden honey
  • 1 cup of aloe vera Barbadensis peeled leaf (or food-grade gel)
  • 100 g of vegetable oil
  • 50 g of linden flowers
  • 2 cups of water

Boil the linden flowers and birch buds in the water for 2-3 minutes. Strain and leave to cool. Separately, melt the honey and then add the aloe vera plant chopped finely. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. When the honey has cooled completely, pour in the infusion from the linden and birch buds and the vegetable oil. Mix well and pour into amber bottles. Shake before use and have one tablespoon three times a day before meals.

6. Lymph Nodes Tumors

For this remedy you need:

  • 50 g birch buds
  • 100 g St. John’s wort
  • 100 g lavender
  • 100 g walnut leaves

Finely chop the herbs and mix them into a herbal tea blend. Add 2 tablespoons of the herbal blend in 800 ml (3 and a half cups) of boiling water. Bring to the boil for one minute, then remove from the heat and place in the oven over minimum heat for 40 minutes. The daily dose is 100 ml of this tea, six times a day.

2 Home Remedies for Cervical Spondylosis - St John's Wort

7. Diabetes

Birch buds tea is a simple aid for people suffering from diabetes. To make this tea pour 400 ml (2 and a half cups) of boiling water over 2-3 tbsp of birch buds and leave to infuse for six hours. Split the tea into three equal parts and drink it throughout the day. This treatment should be followed for two weeks. One of the health benefits of birch buds is that they help balance blood sugar levels, and are a great adjuvant in diabetes.

8. Cardiovascular Problems

Birch buds tea is also great for cardiovascular problems because it helps cleanse the blood vessels. To make this tea, boil 10 grams of dried birch buds in a cup of water for 15 minutes on low heat. Strain and have a tablespoon 3-4 times a day. In addition, some of the other health benefits of birch buds tea are in treating UTIs and kidney stones.

9. Hair Loss

Birch buds tincture is also amazing when it comes to hair loss. To make it, put 100 g of birch buds in 1 l of homemade alcohol and leave to macerate for 10-14 days, stirring daily. Use this birch buds tincture to massage the skin on the scalp to stimulate hair growth. This is one of the less-known health benefits of birch buds.

Health Uses of Birch Catkins

9 Natural Treatments for Rheumatism - Birch Sap
Birch catkins, leaves, and birch sap

Besides the buds, the birch also makes beautiful catkins, which are actually the female flowers of the birch tree. They come in Spring, shortly after the birch is coming into leaves. The tincture made from birch catkins can make an amazing natural aid in heart diseases, tuberculosis, gastric ulcer, gastritis, anemia, but also eczema and skin boils when used topically.

Read More about Birch:
10 Health Benefits of Birch Sap and How to Collect
9 Health Benefits of Birch Leaves & How to Use
3 Health Benefits of Birch Bark and How to Use
The Healing Trees – Birch Tree for Emotional Detox

To make birch catkins tincture, fill up 2/3 of a large jar with birch catkins and the rest with homemade quality alcohol. Seal tightly and leave to soak for two weeks in a warm place. Every few days, give it a good stir. In general, the birch catkins tincture does not need straining. One can take between 20 drops and a teaspoon of tincture, three times a day, 15 minutes before a meal. This natural remedy from birch also improves memory and helps prevent strokes.

Beware!  If pregnant or breastfeeding, ask a health professional before using birch remedies. Please follow the advice of a health specialist.

Tree buds hold new life in them, this is why there is a branch of natural medicine that especially uses young parts from plants to heal. This medicine is called gemmotherapy, and you can learn more about it here. Now that you know what are the health benefits of birch buds and how to use these buds in natural remedies, share this article so more people can learn about simple medicine from nature. Thank you for being here, and stay healthy, naturally!

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9 Health Benefits of Birch Buds with Remedies - MyNaturalTreatment.com

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